Carolyn Harris, Historian, Author, and Royal Commentator

Carolyn Harris, Historian, Author, and Royal Commentator

BY: Catherine Nygren

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Carolyn HarrisCarolyn’s doctoral work in history focused on queenship and revolution in early modern Europe, centering on Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette. Numerous scholarships, including travel grants, helped her to conduct extensive research in European archives that was vital to her dissertation. Her supervisors and committee mentored her in regards to writing, research, and travel, and senior students offered valuable knowledge on how to navigate archives and study paleography. In between time in the archives, she also worked as a teaching assistant and had the opportunity to teach her own courses.

Carolyn finished her degree in just under five years. It was the right amount of time for her, especially considering external factors; funding was principally available in the first four years and in her final year, she was living in Toronto, which was a substantial commute when teaching.

Since graduation, Carolyn has had all sorts of work experience. In addition to teaching history part-time in the School of Continuing Studies at the University of Toronto, she has done a variety of public writing pieces, media appearances, and academic and public guest lectures on matters related to the Royal Family. She guest lectures both “on land and at sea”: at libraries, museums, educational organizations, universities, and cruise ships, on subjects related to the monarchy. She has also published two books: Magna Carta and its Gifts to Canada (2015), Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe (2015), and, forthcoming in 2017, Raising Royalty, which deals with royal parenting.

Even when not dealing with her specific subject matter, her experience from researching her dissertation informs her work to this day. During her degree, however, she would have liked more information about professional opportunities outside of academia, and Carolyn notes that other PhDs pursuing freelance writing and scholarship may find courses and information on entrepreneurship and similar subjects very useful.  

Carolyn HarrisCarolyn’s doctoral work in history focused on queenship and revolution in early modern Europe, centering on Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette. Numerous scholarships, including travel grants, helped her to conduct extensive research in European archives that was vital to her dissertation. Her supervisors and committee mentored her in regards to writing, research, and travel, and senior students offered valuable knowledge on how to navigate archives and study paleography. In between time in the archives, she also worked as a teaching assistant and had the opportunity to teach her own courses.

Carolyn finished her degree in just under five years. It was the right amount of time for her, especially considering external factors; funding was principally available in the first four years and in her final year, she was living in Toronto, which was a substantial commute when teaching.

Since graduation, Carolyn has had all sorts of work experience. In addition to teaching history part-time in the School of Continuing Studies at the University of Toronto, she has done a variety of public writing pieces, media appearances, and academic and public guest lectures on matters related to the Royal Family. She guest lectures both “on land and at sea”: at libraries, museums, educational organizations, universities, and cruise ships, on subjects related to the monarchy. She has also published two books: Magna Carta and its Gifts to Canada (2015), Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe (2015), and, forthcoming in 2017, Raising Royalty, which deals with royal parenting.

Even when not dealing with her specific subject matter, her experience from researching her dissertation informs her work to this day. During her degree, however, she would have liked more information about professional opportunities outside of academia, and Carolyn notes that other PhDs pursuing freelance writing and scholarship may find courses and information on entrepreneurship and similar subjects very useful.  

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