Suzanne McCullagh, Visiting Assistant Professor, Miami, Philosophy

Suzanne McCullagh, Visiting Assistant Professor, Miami, Philosophy

BY: Catherine Nygren

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For her PhD in philosophy, Suzanne crafted a dissertation on limit, collectivity, and the capacity to act, with a focus on reading Hannah Arendt with Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari.

She finished her degree in about seven and a half years, which was the right amount of time. She was teaching full-time while finishing her degree, but it was valuable experience, and she was also involved in a large, international, interuniversity project developing a teaching manual; Suzanne wrote the grant proposal and managed the grant. These opportunities provided valuable opportunities for career development beyond the basic PhD seminar in her program.

While Suzanne was still finishing her degree, she started teaching full-time at Concordia. Then, she taught part-time at Carleton, and now she is back to full-time as a visiting assistant professor at Miami Ohio. The job market is tough, but Suzanne knew the chances of making a career in academic philosophy were slim. Before she did her PhD, she had worked for four years at a national non-profit, and although she could have stayed with the company, she wanted to develop herself in a different way than that career path could provide. However, if she ever needs to find a position outside of academia in the future, she will still have her experience, skills, and success from her pre-academic employment.

Reflecting on her PhD experience, Suzanne would have liked to see professors of different backgrounds and subdisciplines engaging more with each other. Continuity in the practice and profession of philosophy is often overlooked by the perceived divide between and or value of continental and analytic philosophy. These kinds of assumptions sometimes stretch to the gender of the scholar, as well; female philosophers are not just studying feminist philosophy!

For her PhD in philosophy, Suzanne crafted a dissertation on limit, collectivity, and the capacity to act, with a focus on reading Hannah Arendt with Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari.

She finished her degree in about seven and a half years, which was the right amount of time. She was teaching full-time while finishing her degree, but it was valuable experience, and she was also involved in a large, international, interuniversity project developing a teaching manual; Suzanne wrote the grant proposal and managed the grant. These opportunities provided valuable opportunities for career development beyond the basic PhD seminar in her program.

While Suzanne was still finishing her degree, she started teaching full-time at Concordia. Then, she taught part-time at Carleton, and now she is back to full-time as a visiting assistant professor at Miami Ohio. The job market is tough, but Suzanne knew the chances of making a career in academic philosophy were slim. Before she did her PhD, she had worked for four years at a national non-profit, and although she could have stayed with the company, she wanted to develop herself in a different way than that career path could provide. However, if she ever needs to find a position outside of academia in the future, she will still have her experience, skills, and success from her pre-academic employment.

Reflecting on her PhD experience, Suzanne would have liked to see professors of different backgrounds and subdisciplines engaging more with each other. Continuity in the practice and profession of philosophy is often overlooked by the perceived divide between and or value of continental and analytic philosophy. These kinds of assumptions sometimes stretch to the gender of the scholar, as well; female philosophers are not just studying feminist philosophy!

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