TRaCE quantitative summary: what did we learn, and where do we go from here?

TRaCE quantitative summary: what did we learn, and where do we go from here?

BY: Nichole Austin

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Today we’re excited to share our Stage 1 (pilot) quantitative summary. If you’ve been following our data posts, you know that TRaCE was a pilot project designed to collect a range of information on humanities PhD graduates from Canadian institutions. Our (outstanding!) team of research assistants scoured the web to collect these data from publicly available sources before sending everything back to us at the central office for analysis. While we were particularly interested in employment patterns, the data retrieved by the RAs also allowed us to explore disciplinary trends, gender differences, and geographic distributions across a relatively large cross-sectional sample of graduates.

We conducted a number of preliminary analyses as the data rolled in (many of these are posted on our website). The report below summarizes our findings and features updated versions of our initial analyses using the final dataset, which was complete in October 2016.

While the pilot project certainly had its limitations (and we discuss these in detail in the report), this project was an important step in better understanding what happens to humanities PhD graduates post-completion. We hope to use what we learned here to refine our methods and expand our dataset (and analyses) in the future. Enjoy!

You may also want to review our reflections on writing narratives, the feedback from our student interviewers, and our 50th narrative, written by Michelle La Flamme about her grad school experiences as a scholar of Canadian and Indigenous literature and drama, as well as being woman of colour and parent in the academic world.

 

 


Click here to download the Stage 1 summary.


 

Today we’re excited to share our Stage 1 (pilot) quantitative summary. If you’ve been following our data posts, you know that TRaCE was a pilot project designed to collect a range of information on humanities PhD graduates from Canadian institutions. Our (outstanding!) team of research assistants scoured the web to collect these data from publicly available sources before sending everything back to us at the central office for analysis. While we were particularly interested in employment patterns, the data retrieved by the RAs also allowed us to explore disciplinary trends, gender differences, and geographic distributions across a relatively large cross-sectional sample of graduates.

We conducted a number of preliminary analyses as the data rolled in (many of these are posted on our website). The report below summarizes our findings and features updated versions of our initial analyses using the final dataset, which was complete in October 2016.

While the pilot project certainly had its limitations (and we discuss these in detail in the report), this project was an important step in better understanding what happens to humanities PhD graduates post-completion. We hope to use what we learned here to refine our methods and expand our dataset (and analyses) in the future. Enjoy!

You may also want to review our reflections on writing narratives, the feedback from our student interviewers, and our 50th narrative, written by Michelle La Flamme about her grad school experiences as a scholar of Canadian and Indigenous literature and drama, as well as being woman of colour and parent in the academic world.

 

 


Click here to download the Stage 1 summary.


 

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